Quiz – What was the primary precursor network to the internet called?

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What was the primary precursor network to the internet called?

Discover the answer at the bottom of this page 🙂


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The answer is …. FACT…
The primary precursor network to the internet was called ARPANET.

ARPANET, set up in 1969, was one of the first general-purpose computer networks. It connected time-sharing computers at government-supported research sites, principally universities in the United States.

The Advanced Research Projects Agency Network (ARPANET) was the first wide-area packet-switched network with distributed control and one of the first networks to implement the TCP/IP protocol suite. … The ARPANET was established by the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) of the United States Department of Defense.

The ARPANET became slow and outdated; in 1990 it formally shut down. Because it was a small part of the now larger network, the shutdown went unnoticed. The network outgrew the ARPANET.

In 1983, a 17-year-old Poulsen, using the alias Dark Dante, hacked into ARPANET, the Pentagon’s computer network.

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